What are the symptoms and risk factors for stretch marks?

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Stretch marks can be treated with topical treatments or laser skin resurfacing by some cosmetic surgeons.
Risk factor of Stretch marks

Stretch marks are indentation stripes that occur on the belly, breasts, hips, buttocks, and other parts of the body as a result of pregnancy or other factors. Women who are pregnant, especially in their later trimester, are more likely to suffer from them. Stretch marks are neither unpleasant nor hazardous, but they can be unsightly for some people who do not like how they make their skin appear.

Stretch marks are not a medical condition that requires treatment. They frequently diminish with time, whether or not they are treated. It is possible that they will never be totally eliminated.

Symptom

Stretch marks are not all the same in appearance. They differ based on how long you’ve had them, what caused them, where they are located on your body, and the type of skin you have on your face and body. The following are examples of common variations:

  • Stripes or lines indented on the abdomen, breasts, hips, buttocks, or other body parts.
  • a number of locations on the body
  • Pink, red, black, blue, and purple streaks can be seen.
  • Bright streaks of color that fade to a softer shade of gray
  • Vast splotches of blood cover large portions of the body
  • Streaks with indentations
  • Streaks or lines running parallel to the skin’s surface
  • Lines that are red, blue, or purple in color
  • Stretch marks can also be itchy in some cases.

Individuals’ stretch marks may seem different from one another based on where they are located on their bodies and the color of their skin.

Diagnosis

Most of the time, stretch marks do not require a diagnosis. Your doctor may perform a skin examination as well as a review of your medical history. If your doctor believes that your level of the stress hormone cortisol has increased, you may be asked to undergo further testing.

Risk Factor

Stretch marks are not all the same in appearance. They differ based on how long you’ve had them, what caused them, where they are located on your body, and the type of skin you have on your face and body. The following are examples of common variations:

  • Stripes or lines indented on the abdomen, breasts, hips, buttocks, or other body parts.
  • a number of locations on the body
  • Pink, red, black, blue, and purple streaks can be seen.
  • Bright streaks of color that fade to a softer shade of gray
  • Vast splotches of blood cover large portions of the body
  • Streaks with indentations
  • Streaks or lines running parallel to the skin’s surface
  • Lines that are red, blue, or purple in color
  • Stretch marks can also be itchy in some cases.

Individuals’ stretch marks may seem different from one another based on where they are located on their bodies and the color of their skin.

Prevention

 Healthy lifestyle

Stretch mark lotions, ointments, and other treatments are widely available, and many of them promise to prevent or treat stretch marks. Using products including cocoa butter, vitamin E, and glycolic acid, for example, is not only not hazardous, but it is also unlikely that they would provide any benefit.

Generally speaking, stretch marks dissolve and become less obvious with time, and they do not necessitate any special self-care or home therapy.

Alternative medicine

The notion that applying creams, oils, or lotions to your skin will help prevent or cure stretch marks is not backed up by sufficient scientific data at this time.

If you’re expecting a child, see your doctor before using any alternative items that promise to cure or prevent stretch marks from appearing.

Reference

www.simple-tips-to-treat-stretch-marks-in-teenagers

www.instyle.com/beauty/skin/stretch-marks-body-neutrality

https://www.insider.com/how-do-you-get-stretch-marks

allure.com/story/how-to-get-rid-of-stretch-marks