Treatment of dark circles under the eyes

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We typically link tiredness or lack of sleep with dark circles beneath the eyes. Other reasons for dark circles include poor nutrition and excessive sun exposure.
Prevention of dark circle

We typically link tiredness or lack of sleep with dark circles beneath the eyes. Other reasons for dark circles include poor nutrition and excessive sun exposure.

Causes of dark circles

  • Aging
  • Menstruation and pregnancy
  • Heredity
  • Pigmentation
  • Sun overexposure
  • Fatigue
  • Chemical peels
  • Transfer of fat
  • Dehydration
  • Trauma
  • Genetics
  • Smoking
  • Nutritional deficiency.
  • Scratching or rubbing your eyes excessively.
  • By drinking alcohol or smoking, etc.

For those with dark circles under their eyes, there are home and medical solutions.

Increase your sleep time. 

The majority of individuals should aim to obtain seven to eight hours of sleep every night on average. This should result in a more radiant complexion as well as a reduction in the appearance of dark circles.

Ensure that you drink lots of water.

The recommended daily water consumption for men is around 13 cups, while for women it is approximately 9 cups. You can drink flavored sparkling or still water to keep your skin and body nourished if you don’t enjoy drinking regular water.

Compressing with ice 

A cold compress applied to the eyes will constrict the blood vessels beneath the skin, minimizing their visibility and the appearance of dark circles.

Use sunscreen on a daily basis

Skin cancer accelerated aging, and hyperpigmentation associated with dark circles may all be prevented by using broad-spectrum sunscreen whenever you expect to be outside — even if it’s simply to commute to and from work.

Maintain an elevated position

Keeping your head raised as you sleep helps to prevent fluid from gathering under the eyes, which may cause them to seem puffy in the morning and cast shadows beneath the eyes that appear as dark circles if not addressed.

Cold Compress 

Apply a cold compress for approximately 10 minutes in the morning or evening – or, better yet, in the morning AND the evening – as needed. That is the most convenient approach to experiment with this dark circle-reducing procedure. If you already have a mask that you can keep in your fridge and use twice daily, that is the best option. Remember to maintain it clean and give it a nice soapy scrub at least once or twice a week!

Cold Teabags 

To use instead of a cold compress or mask, use tea bags instead of the items listed above. Many teas, such as green tea, offer the extra advantage of antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory characteristics that can help calm tight capillaries in the under-eye region, which can be particularly problematic.

To use cold tea bags as a compress, first, soak the teabag in clean water before placing it on the affected area.

Vitamin E Oil 

Vitamin E helps to combat the effects of free radicals, which are responsible for the appearance of wrinkles and other indications of age. Using a drop of oil (a little goes a long way) and gently rubbing it into the skin, you may reduce the appearance of dark under-eye circles before bedtime. Leave this on your skin overnight, and then rinse with warm water in the morning to remove any remaining residue.

Moisturizers should be used twice daily

Do not forget to keep up with the most basic excellent habit – using a moisturizer twice daily. While you should apply a thinner moisturizer with an SPF throughout the day, you should also use a thicker moisturizer and eye cream before going to bed at night.

Remove Makeup 

Do not go to sleep with your makeup still on or rub your mascara and eyeliner off before going to sleep. Make use of your profession

Exercise + Meditation

Regular exercise improves circulation and brings blood flow to the skin, resulting in a brighter, younger-looking complexion, particularly the delicate skin around the eyes. Moreover, regular endorphin production keeps sadness and anxiety at bay, making you happier, calmer, and more balanced.

Stress (and the wrinkles and fine lines induced by stress) can be reduced by mindfulness exercises, long runs, and swimming.

Green vegetables

Eating green vegetables helps to enhance the texture of the skin by increasing blood circulation in the body. Green vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli, are high in vitamin K, which is necessary for improving blood circulation and reducing discoloration and puffiness.

​Orange

Oranges are high in vitamins C and A, which both aid in the production of collagen and the elimination of free radicals from the skin.

Cucumber

Cucumber has a large amount of water, which helps to rehydrate the skin. Cucumber consumption also aids in the stimulation of collagen formation and the reduction of uneven skin tone. This fruit is also high in vitamins K, A, E, and C, all of which help to enhance coagulation, the flexibility of blood vessels, and the clotting of the bloodstream.

Medical Treatment for Dark Circles

Chemical peels can assist to reduce the appearance of dark circles around the eyes by adjusting the amount of melanin present on the skin’s surface.

Laser treatment can help to reduce the appearance of dark circles around the eyes by targeting the pigmentation around the eyes and also encouraging collagen production.

When Should You Visit a Doctor?

Typically, dark circles under the eyes are caused by stress or sleep deprivation. If you change your way of living and get enough sleep, they should gradually go away over time. When dark circles do not go with time or if there is swelling beneath one eye, you should consult your doctor about the situation.

Conclusion

Dark circles under the eyes are typically transitory and do not indicate a serious health problem. In this post, you will get information on how to reduce the appearance of dark circles at home and through medical treatment options. Make an appointment with your doctor, who will assist you in selecting the most appropriate treatment for your problem.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5796020/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3972926/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9870547

http://www.plantsjournal.com/vol1Issue1/Issue_jan_2013/3.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19148543

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23992162/