Expressing and storing breastmilk

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When you store your breastmilk properly after pumping, you may be assured that your baby will always receive the nutrition he requires while you are gone.
Breast Milk

In the event that you will be away from your baby for an extended period of time, pump or manually express your milk at the same time as you would have typically nursed your child. This will assist you in maintaining your milk production so that you may continue nursing even if you return to work or school after your pregnancy. When you store your breastmilk properly after pumping, you may be assured that your baby will always receive the nutrition he requires while you are gone.

 

EXPRESS YOUR MILK MORE QUICKLY

If you use an electric breast pump and your hands at the same time, you will be able to express your milk considerably more quickly.

 

PURCHASE A FREE PUMP

Your insurance plan may provide a free pump if you return to work or school or are having trouble producing milk. Please call the number on your health plan card. If your insurance won’t cover a pump, contact your WIC clinic. Helpful.

 

PUMP YOUR MATERNITY LEAVE

If you intend to return to work, start pumping while you are still on maternity leave. It will help you prepare and create a breastmilk reserve. You may start whenever you like. Start with one daily pumping session. Mornings are often easier for parents to express milk. Once you’ve found a good time, attempt to stick to it every day.

 

KEEP A SCHEDULE

When you return to work, you will need to express your milk at feeding times. Let your boss know how important it is to keep the same routine. Pumping at work encourages your body to maintain producing milk. It will help keep your body relaxed so you can concentrate.

Your baby’s thoughts can help milk flow.

The sight of your baby, the sound of his or her voice on a recording, or the thought of nursing your infant can all help you relax and begin to produce milk more quickly.

 

How to cleanly pump breastmilk?

  • Always cleanse your hands before pumping. Use soap and warm water or a hand sanitizer with 60% alcohol.
  • Follow the CDC’s instructions for cleaning and sanitizing your breast pump. So no hazardous bacteria grows on your pump components.
  • Make sure the pump tubing and other parts are clean. Only pump when the kit and tubing are clean.
  • If you rent or otherwise share a pump kit, sanitize all parts before pumping.

 

Pumping Tips

WASH YOUR HANDS.

Before you begin pumping breastmilk, wash your hands well and stimulate both breasts.

EXPRESS INTO THE BOTTLE OF THE PUMP

Finally, finish by manually expressing your milk into the bottle shield of the pump or by pumping one breast at a time. Make use of whichever method allows you to express the most milk.

 

PUMP ON A REGULAR BASIS

Despite the fact that your breasts produce more milk than you will be able to pump, it is critical that you pump on a regular basis when you are away from your baby. It will help you to maintain your milk production.

START SUCTION LOW

Start with mild suction on both breasts. Then raise suction to comfort. If you have one hand free, try compressing your breasts (softly squeeze, then let go) to get more milk out. Keep going until your milk flow slows down.

 

TO THE PUMP’S BOTTLE EXPRESS

Finally, finish by manually expressing your milk into the bottle shield of the pump or by pumping one breast at a time. Make use of whichever method allows you to express the most milk.

 

PUMP ON A REGULAR BASIS

Despite the fact that your breasts produce more milk than you will be able to pump, it is critical that you pump on a regular basis when you are away from your baby. It will help you to maintain your milk production.

 

PUMPING SHOULD BE SAFE

Pumping shouldn’t be detrimental. If you are experiencing discomfort or trouble pumping, get assistance from the WIC office or a lactation counselor.

If you have suffered an injury or infection as a result of using a breast pump, you should contact the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This can assist them in better understanding the hazards associated with breast pumps and, in some cases, prevent difficulties from occurring in the future.